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HomeGreek PhilosphyPriceless 800-Year-Old Treasure Featuring Three Golden Lions Unearthed

Priceless 800-Year-Old Treasure Featuring Three Golden Lions Unearthed


Jan Bartek – AncientPages.com – A priceless 800-year-old pendant relationship again to the twelfth century was found on a web site that was as soon as an Iron Age or Romano British settlement.

The treasure was unearthed by archaeologists engaged on the HS2 high-speed rail undertaking.

Priceless 800-Year-Old Treasure Featuring Three Golden Lions Unearthed

Credit: HS2 Ltd.

The iconic three golden lions on a discipline of crimson – mirroring the distinctive England soccer crest was present in Wormleighton, in Wormleighton, a village in Warwickshire about 50 miles southeast of Birmingham, United Kingdom.

Associated with the arms of England, this type of heraldry was in use by the Crown between 1189-1340. The pendant would seemingly have embellished a horse harness.

“HS2’s archaeology programme has given us an unprecedented alternative to find, excavate and research British historical past,” a spokeswoman for HS2 Ltd stated.

Being nonetheless in fine condition, archaeologists suppose the pendant was fairly new when it was misplaced, and it might have grow to be indifferent from its suspension becoming while in use.

The use of lions as an emblem of England dates again to the primary Norman king, William the Conqueror, who reigned from 1066 till 1087.

Priceless 800-Year-Old Treasure Featuring Three Golden Lions Unearthed

Credit: HS2 Ltd.

William the Conqueror used two lions on a crimson background as his coat of arms and introduced the image to the English throne.

Henry II, King of England from 1154 till his dying in 1189, added a 3rd lion after his marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, which happened in 1152.

See additionally: More Archaeology News

This kind of harness pendant depicts the Arms of England from the reign of Henry’s son Richard I (1189-1199) to the institution of the Lancastrian Dynasty in 1399, so it seemingly dates again as early because the twelfth century.

Written by Jan Bartek – AncientPages.com Staff Writer




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